The Appendix of the Mind

harrystylesdildo:

you never fully realize just how weird people are until you work a minimum wage costumer service job

1,284,507 plays

dickcraft:

our-savior-the-glow-cloud:

turntechdave:

spatsula:

dardanos:

actualmioda:

Why bring back old memes when we can back this song?

image

2004 is calling me… whispering

numa numa yay

the funny thing about this is I sincerely have followers that were born in the same month i discovered this flash video on newgrounds

fuuccckk I completely erased all memory of newgrounds.

War flashbacks

You want to leave but don’t (want to) take me, don’t (want to) take me with you♫

Don’t forget our time in the Linden trees…

shauneezy:

Ferguson PD be like.

shauneezy:

Ferguson PD be like.

carolineeand:

nothing-rhymes-with-grantaire:

perspicious:


WHAT YOU SHOULD DO:    Stay with us and keep calm.The last thing we need when we’re panicking, is to have someone else panicking with us.
Offer medicine if we usually take it during an attack.You might have to ask whether or not we take medicine- heck, some might not; but please, ask. It really helps.
Move us to a quiet place.We need time to think, to breathe. Being surrounded by people isn’t going to help.
Don’t make assumptions about what we need. Ask.We’ll tell you what we need. Sometimes; you may have to ask- but never assume.
Speak to us in short, simple sentences.
Be predictable. Avoid surprises.
Help slow our breathing by breathing us or by counting slowly to 10.As odd as it sounds, it works.


                                                                                                                 


WHAT YOU SHOULDN’T DO:1. Say, “You have nothing to be panicked about.”We know. We know. We know. And because we know we have nothing to be panicked about, we panic even more. When I realize that my anxiety is unfounded, I panic even more because then I feel like I’m not in touch with reality. It’s unsettling. Scary.Most of the time, a panic attack is irrational. Sometimes they stem from circumstances — a certain couch triggers a bad memory or being on an airplane makes you claustrophobic or a break up causes you to flip your lid — but mostly, the reasons I’m panicking are complex, hard to articulate or simply, unknown. I could tell myself all day that I have no reason to be having a panic attack and I would still be panicking. Sometimes, because I’m a perfectionist, I become even more overwhelmed when I think my behaviour is “unacceptable” (as I often believe it is when I’m panicking). I know it’s all in my mind, but my mind can be a pretty dark and scary place when it gets going.Alternate suggestion: Say, “I understand you’re upset. It is okay. You have a right to be upset and I am here to help.”2. Say, “Calm down.”This reminds me of a MadTV sketch where Bob Newhart plays a therapist who tells his patients to simply “Stop it!” whenever they express anxiety or fear. As a sketch, it’s funny. In real life, it’s one of the worst things you can do to someone having a panic attack. When someone tells me to “stop panicking” or to “calm down,” I just think, “Oh, okay. I haven’t tried that one. Hold on, let me get out a pen and paper and jot that down, you jerk.”Instead of taking action so that they do relax, simply telling a panicking person to “calm down” or “stop it” does nothing. No-thing.Alternate suggestion: The best thing to do is to listen and support. In order to calm them down without the generalities, counting helps.3. Say, “I’m just going to leave you alone for a minute.”Being left alone while panicking makes my heart race even harder. The last thing I want is to be left by myself with my troubled brain. Many of my panic attacks spark from over-thinking and it’s helpful to have another person with me, not only for medical reasons (in case I pass out or need water) but also it’s helpful to have another person around to force me to think about something other than the noise in my head.Alternate suggestion: It sometimes helps me if the person I’m with distracts me by telling me a story or sings to me. I need to get out of my own head and think about something other than my own panic.4. Say, “You’re overreacting.”Here’s the thing: I’m not. Panic attacks might be in my head, but I’m in actual physical pain. If you’d cut open your leg, no one would be telling you you’re overreacting. It’s a common trope in mental health to diminish the feelings or experience of someone suffering from anxiety or panic because there’s no visible physical ailment and because there’s no discernible reason for the person to be having such a strong fear reaction.The worst thing you can tell someone who is panicking is that they are overreacting.Alternate suggestion: Treat a panic attack like any other medical emergency. Listen to what the person is telling you. Get them water if they need it. It helps me if someone rubs my back a little. If you’re in over your head, don’t hesitate to call 911 (or whatever the emergency services number is where you are). But please, take the person seriously. Mental health deserves the same respect as physical health.



CREDIT [X]  [X]

This post is important!
One of my girls at camp had a pain-induced panic attack during lunchtime and if it weren’t for posts like this that I see on Tumblr, I might have done something wrong or not known what to do. But because I’d read posts like these, I was able to keep her calm enough that the camp nurse could get her medication to help her and take over when I had to leave to take care of the rest of my cabin.

I don’t think the wanting company thing is universal. When I’m having panic attacks I don’t like being around other people, it makes me feel pressure to “get over it” so I can stop wasting their time, and I don’t know how to communicate while it’s happening that I’d like to be left alone. It makes me feel weird and low-status and self-conscious and hyper-aware of the fact that I’m incapable of communicating what I want. What ends up happening is I physically get myself to a place of calm while my brain is still rushing and then once I get alone I crash that much harder.
PS: There are definitely at least 4 people I can think of who follow my Tumblr who have sat with me while I had a panic attack (or the beginning of one, or the end of one, or a limited symptom attack) and I hope none of you read this and are like “Well fuck me then!” In all cases when a person is available for me and my anxiety it makes me feel very loved and understood by that person and safe to be myself around then. But this is logical reasonable Caroline talking, not pretty-sure-I’m-going-to-die Caroline. Pretty-sure-I’m-going-to-die Caroline feels weird when you see me hyperventilating and crying and doesn’t know how to talk to you the next day.

carolineeand:

nothing-rhymes-with-grantaire:

perspicious:

WHAT YOU SHOULD DO:
    
  1. Stay with us and keep calm.
    The last thing we need when we’re panicking, is to have someone else panicking with us.

  2. Offer medicine if we usually take it during an attack.
    You might have to ask whether or not we take medicine- heck, some might not; but please, ask. It really helps.

  3. Move us to a quiet place.
    We need time to think, to breathe. Being surrounded by people isn’t going to help.

  4. Don’t make assumptions about what we need. Ask.
    We’ll tell you what we need. Sometimes; you may have to ask- but never assume.

  5. Speak to us in short, simple sentences.

  6. Be predictable. Avoid surprises.

  7. Help slow our breathing by breathing us or by counting slowly to 10.
    As odd as it sounds, it works.
                                                                                                                 
WHAT YOU SHOULDN’T DO:

1. Say, “You have nothing to be panicked about.”
We know. We know. We know. And because we know we have nothing to be panicked about, we panic even more. When I realize that my anxiety is unfounded, I panic even more because then I feel like I’m not in touch with reality. It’s unsettling. Scary.

Most of the time, a panic attack is irrational. Sometimes they stem from circumstances — a certain couch triggers a bad memory or being on an airplane makes you claustrophobic or a break up causes you to flip your lid — but mostly, the reasons I’m panicking are complex, hard to articulate or simply, unknown. I could tell myself all day that I have no reason to be having a panic attack and I would still be panicking. Sometimes, because I’m a perfectionist, I become even more overwhelmed when I think my behaviour is “unacceptable” (as I often believe it is when I’m panicking). I know it’s all in my mind, but my mind can be a pretty dark and scary place when it gets going.

Alternate suggestion: Say, “I understand you’re upset. It is okay. You have a right to be upset and I am here to help.”


2. Say, “Calm down.”
This reminds me of a MadTV sketch where Bob Newhart plays a therapist who tells his patients to simply “Stop it!” whenever they express anxiety or fear. As a sketch, it’s funny. In real life, it’s one of the worst things you can do to someone having a panic attack. When someone tells me to “stop panicking” or to “calm down,” I just think, “Oh, okay. I haven’t tried that one. Hold on, let me get out a pen and paper and jot that down, you jerk.

Instead of taking action so that they do relax, simply telling a panicking person to “calm down” or “stop it” does nothing. No-thing.

Alternate suggestion: The best thing to do is to listen and support. In order to calm them down without the generalities, counting helps.


3. Say, “I’m just going to leave you alone for a minute.”
Being left alone while panicking makes my heart race even harder. The last thing I want is to be left by myself with my troubled brain. Many of my panic attacks spark from over-thinking and it’s helpful to have another person with me, not only for medical reasons (in case I pass out or need water) but also it’s helpful to have another person around to force me to think about something other than the noise in my head.

Alternate suggestion: It sometimes helps me if the person I’m with distracts me by telling me a story or sings to me. I need to get out of my own head and think about something other than my own panic.


4. Say, “You’re overreacting.”
Here’s the thing: I’m not. Panic attacks might be in my head, but I’m in actual physical pain. If you’d cut open your leg, no one would be telling you you’re overreacting. It’s a common trope in mental health to diminish the feelings or experience of someone suffering from anxiety or panic because there’s no visible physical ailment and because there’s no discernible reason for the person to be having such a strong fear reaction.

The worst thing you can tell someone who is panicking is that they are overreacting.

Alternate suggestion: Treat a panic attack like any other medical emergency. Listen to what the person is telling you. Get them water if they need it. It helps me if someone rubs my back a little. If you’re in over your head, don’t hesitate to call 911 (or whatever the emergency services number is where you are). But please, take the person seriously. Mental health deserves the same respect as physical health.


CREDIT [X]  [X]

This post is important!

One of my girls at camp had a pain-induced panic attack during lunchtime and if it weren’t for posts like this that I see on Tumblr, I might have done something wrong or not known what to do. But because I’d read posts like these, I was able to keep her calm enough that the camp nurse could get her medication to help her and take over when I had to leave to take care of the rest of my cabin.

I don’t think the wanting company thing is universal. When I’m having panic attacks I don’t like being around other people, it makes me feel pressure to “get over it” so I can stop wasting their time, and I don’t know how to communicate while it’s happening that I’d like to be left alone. It makes me feel weird and low-status and self-conscious and hyper-aware of the fact that I’m incapable of communicating what I want. What ends up happening is I physically get myself to a place of calm while my brain is still rushing and then once I get alone I crash that much harder.

PS: There are definitely at least 4 people I can think of who follow my Tumblr who have sat with me while I had a panic attack (or the beginning of one, or the end of one, or a limited symptom attack) and I hope none of you read this and are like “Well fuck me then!” In all cases when a person is available for me and my anxiety it makes me feel very loved and understood by that person and safe to be myself around then. But this is logical reasonable Caroline talking, not pretty-sure-I’m-going-to-die Caroline. Pretty-sure-I’m-going-to-die Caroline feels weird when you see me hyperventilating and crying and doesn’t know how to talk to you the next day.

idontgiveahex:

i had a really good joke but autocorrect ruined the lunchtime

caterjillar:

ifearnofish
70sscifiart:

Space Opera

70sscifiart:

Space Opera

ptolemy2:

A biologist, a physicist, and a chemist go to the beach on holiday. While there, the biologist wades into the sea, starts examining interesting Marine flora and fauna, gets distracted and accidentally drowns. The physicist gets enchanted by the shape of the waves coming to shore, wades into the water and accidentally drowns. The chemist upon seeing these, whips out his notebook and writes, “biologists and physicists. Insoluble in water. “

callmepo:

Hardwood by CallMePo
Poison Ivy meets Groot.
Fun idea I had to draw.

callmepo:

Hardwood by CallMePo

Poison Ivy meets Groot.

Fun idea I had to draw.

erotiterrorist:

If I time traveled and talked to my teenage self, he would be so disappointed that we are not living in an apocalypse.

erotiterrorist:

If I time traveled and talked to my teenage self, he would be so disappointed that we are not living in an apocalypse.

cenchempics:

IT’S ELEMENTAL
Andres Tretiakov, a lab technician at St. Paul’s School in London, created these element blocks with the goal of building a tangible periodic table. Each element sample sits within a glass ampoule, which is embedded in a polyester casting. Shown here are samples of iodine, bromine, and neon.
Credit: Submitted by Andres Tretiakov (Enter our photo contest here)

cenchempics:

IT’S ELEMENTAL

Andres Tretiakov, a lab technician at St. Paul’s School in London, created these element blocks with the goal of building a tangible periodic table. Each element sample sits within a glass ampoule, which is embedded in a polyester casting. Shown here are samples of iodine, bromine, and neon.

Credit: Submitted by Andres Tretiakov (Enter our photo contest here)

sci-universe:

A toast to these great astronomerettes, who didn’t get credit for their work in their lifetime.

Read about Annie Jump Cannon, Henrietta Swan Leavitt, and Cecilia Payne-Gaposchkin

zyxst:

Benedict Cumberbatch does the Ice Bucket Challenge

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCHv4JRboi9NnegN9RyhML-A